U   N   S   U   N   G

MARCH 17 - APRIL 22, 2018

EXTENDED TO MAY 6, 2018

OPENING RECEPTION: SATURDAY, MARCH 17, 4 - 6 PM

PREVIEW: MARCH 8 - 16, 2018











       JIM KEMPNER FINE ART

       501 WEST 23RD STREET

       NEW YORK, NY

       WWW.JIMKEMPNERFINEART.COM

       INFO@JIMKEMPNER.COM

       1.212.206.6872

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE


CAROLE FREEMAN

UNSUNG

MARCH 17 - APRIL 22, 2018


EXTENDED TO MAY 6, 2018

OPENING RECEPTION: SATURDAY, MARCH 17, 4 - 6 PM

PREVIEW: MARCH 8 - 16, 2018


JIM KEMPNER FINE ART

501 WEST 23RD STREET

NEW YORK, NY


   

To ward off alienation and gloom, it is only necessary to remember the unremembered heroes of the past, and to look around us for the unnoticed heroes of the present. - Howard Zinn, Unsung Heroes

Jim Kempner Fine Art is pleased to announce UNSUNG, its first exhibition with the contemporary figurative painter Carole Freeman. The exhibition features twenty-four 12 x 9” portraits of little known or not-known-enough American heroes who represent a range of social and political issues including sexual harassment, fake news and the “post-truth” moment, racism, the environment, terrorism, Islamophobia, and civil, LGBTQ and women’s rights. UNSUNG will run from March 17- April 22, 2018, with an opening reception on Saturday, March 17, from 4-6 pm.

Carole Freeman subversively takes on topical issues through her depictions of controversial and courageous figures. Consideration of historical and present day events and statistical details led to a roster of subjects who reflect the diversity of the US population. Subjects are as varied as a physician, intellectuals, a mother, pilots, a miner, a sex educator, and politicians. Freeman’s portraits, realized from sourced images, are imbued with a compelling and vivid immediacy. Modest in size yet powerful in concept and execution, these luminous paintings affirm the quiet potency of the portrait genre. UNSUNG, an implied yet meaningful meditation on the present US political climate, offers an aesthetic and provocative chant for the possibilities of beauty and good in chaos.

Examples from the exhibition include William Moore McCulloch who worked tirelessly for equal rights at the risk of political suicide and was recognized by President Kennedy for his important influence in passing the Civil Rights Act; Edward Brooke, one of the first Republicans to call on President Nixon to resign in light of the Watergate scandal; Mose Wright, the great uncle of Emmett Till, who in 1955 testified at the trial of the men who brutally abducted, tortured, and murdered a fourteen-year-old African-American boy for allegedly whistling at a white woman; and Lois Jenson, a Minnesota miner who, in 1988, led Lois E. Jenson v. Eveleth Taconite Co. and won the first class-action sexual harassment lawsuit in the United States.

Also represented are four New Yorkers: Jane Jacobs, a journalist, author, and activist who fought and stopped the Robert Moses Lower Manhattan Expressway; Amy Goodman who is an investigative journalist considered a “guardian of truth” by Rolling Stone magazine, and the host and producer of the news program Democracy Now!; Muhammed Salman Hamdani, a Muslim NYC Police Department cadet killed while helping others during the aftermath of 9/11 yet falsely investigated for possible involvement; and Sylvia Rae Rivera, a transgender activist and self-proclaimed drag queen who was a founding member of the Gay Liberation Front, Gay Activists Alliance, and the Street Transvestite Action Revolutionaries (STAR) organization.


FULL BIOGRAPHIES HERE

W.E.B. DU BOIS

(1868-1963)


"The cost of liberty is less than the price of repression."


Sociologist, historian, author, civil rights activist and co-founder of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP).

EDWARD W. BROOKE III

(1919-2015)


“The polarization of Congress; the decline of civility; and the rise of attack politics in the1980s, the 1990s, and the early years of the new century are a blot on our political system and a disservice to the American people.”

The first African American elected to the United States Senate by popular vote and one of the first Republicans to call on Nixon to resign in light of the Watergate Scandal.

RACHEL CARSON

(1907-1964)


“But man is a part of nature, and his war against nature is inevitably a war against himself.”


Considered godmother of the environmental movement and best known for Silent Spring (1962) which focused on the dangers of pesticides and the disinformation from the chemical industries.

NOAM CHOMSKY

(b. 1928)


“Our only real hope for democracy is that we get the money out of politics entirely and establish a system of publicly funded elections.”

Activist, dissident, “father of modern linguistics”, one of the most critically engaged public intellectuals and cited scholars in modern history.

JERRIE COBB

(b. 1931)


“I would give my life to fly in space.”

Pilot and first woman to pass qualifying exams for astronaut training in 1960 though Congress denied her a position at NASA because of her gender.


MARY WARE DENNETT

(1872-1947)


“It (sex) is the most wonderful and interesting part of growing up.”


Radical sex educator censored and convicted of obscenity for her 1919 publication The Sex Side of Life.



ELIZABETH ECKFORD

(b. 1941)


“They [mob] moved closer and closer…Somebody started yelling…I tried to see a friendly face somewhere in the crowd - someone who maybe could help. I looked into the face of an old woman and it seemed a kind face, but when I looked at her again, she spat on me.”

One of a group of black students, “Little Rock Nine”, chosen to attend Central High School in Arkansas in 1957, after segregation in public schools was ruled as unconstitutional.

DR. PAUL FARMER

(b. 1959)


"The idea that some lives matter less is the root of all that is wrong with the world."


Physician known for his humanitarian work in developing countries, co-founder of Partners in Health created to provide a preferential option for the poor in healthcare, to serve as an antidote to despair.

AMY GOODMAN

(b. 1957)


“I've learned in my years as a journalist that when a politician says 'That's ridiculous' you're probably on the right track.”


American journalist, author, and independent news broadcaster on Democracy Now!, named "guardian of truth" by Rolling Stone magazine.

GLENN GREENWALD

(b. 1967)


“Transparency is for those who carry out public duties and exercise public power. Privacy is for everyone else.”


Investigative journalist, co-founder of The Intercept, best known for his contact with Edward Snowden and his reporting on global surveillance.


MOHAMMAD SALMAN HAMDANI

(1977-2001)


“He gave his life. They tried to take away his dignity in death and they cannot do it.”  Talat Hamdani, Mohammad’s Mother


Pakistani American, New York City Police Cadet and Emergency Medical Technician who, during 9/11 rushed towards the smoke to save others, yet, because of his Muslim background was investigated for terrorism before his body was found under the rubble of the World Trade Center.



DOLORES HUERTA

(b. 1930)


“Every moment is an organizing opportunity, every person a potential activist, every minute a chance to change the world.” 


Latino activist, co-founder of the National Farm Workers of America Union, coined the famous slogan, Sí se puede — Spanish for "Yes, we can", arrested over twenty-two times for protesting against causes that harm agricultural labor unions, women’s rights, and LGBTQ+ rights.

JANE JACOBS

(1916-2006)


“Cities have the capability of providing something for everybody, only because, and only when, they are created by everybody.”


Urban writer and activist who stopped the Robert Moses Lower Manhattan Expressway, wrote The Death and Life of Great American Cities.

LOIS JENSON

(b.1948)


“It was like they'd never seen a woman before.”


A single mom simply trying to feed her children as one of the few female miners working in the Minnesota iron mines, which resulted in filing the first US class action sexual harassment lawsuit.

LILLY LEDBETTER 

(b. 1938)


“We sought justice because equal pay for equal work is an American value. And, in a 5-4 (Supreme Court) decision, they stood on the side of those who short-changed my pay, my overtime, and my retirement just because I am a woman.”

Worked for 19 years before realizing she was paid thousands of dollars less than male colleagues of the same seniority, became the plaintiff in the discrimination case Ledbetter v. Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co which led to the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act of 2009.

WILLIAM GRIFFITH WILSON

(1895-1971)


“We are not cured of alcoholism. What we have is a daily reprieve contingent on the maintenance of our spiritual condition.”

Known as Bill W., wrote Alcoholics Anonymous: Twelve Steps and Twelve Traditions,

co-founded Alcoholics Anonymous after being admitted to hospitals over four times for his growing alcoholism which, he was told, would lead to his death.



CANDY LIGHTNER 

(b. 1946)


"The road through grief is a rocky one. Traveling along it requires courage, patience, wisdom, and hope."


Founded Mothers Against Drunk Driving, one of the most influential non-profit organizations in the United States, after a drunk driver killed her 13-year-old daughter.

MOSE WRIGHT 
(1890-1973)
 
“There he is….and there’s Mr. Bryant.”

Preacher who faced threats against his life when he testified against the men who murdered his nephew Emmett Till, the fourteen-year old African-American boy brutally abducted, tortured, and murdered for allegedly whistling at a white woman.

WILLIAM MOORE MCCULLOCH

(1901-1980)


“I know that you, more than anyone, were responsible for the civil rights legislation of the 1960s. You made a personal commitment to President Kennedy in October 1963, against all the interests of your district. When he was gone, your personal integrity and character were such that you held to that commitment despite enormous pressure and political temptations not to do so.”   Jacqueline Kennedy


Republican member of the House of Representatives instrumental in passing the 1964 Civil Rights Act, the most important law of the 20th century, though considered political suicide.

BILL MCKIBBEN

(b. 1960) 


“There is a tendency at every important but difficult crossroad to pretend that it's not really there.” 


Environmental author and activist credited for introducing the concept of climate change to the public, founder of 350.org to oppose new coal, oil and gas projects and organizer of The People’s Climate March, the largest fossil fuel rally in history.

HUGH THOMPSON JR.

(1943-2006)


“I'm going to go over and get them out of the bunker myself. If the squad opens up on them, shoot 'em.”


Vietnam War hero who landed his helicopter in the line of fire between American troops and Vietnamese civilians to stop the 1968 My Lai Massacre, pointing his own guns at the U.S. soldiers to prevent more killings, then evacuating civilians against the orders of his superiors.

RICHARD OAKES

(1942–1972)


“This is the beginning of our fight for justice and self-determination.”


Mohawk Native American activist who introduced Native American studies in university curricula, spurred changes in US federal government policy toward Native Americans, led the occupation of Alcatraz Island, died of a gunshot wound at the age of 30.

SYLVIA RAE​ RIVERA

(1951-2002)


“Hell hath no fury like a drag queen scorned.”


One of the country’s first transgender activists who, at age 11 was kicked out of her home because of her effeminate behavior, began working as a prostitute but rose to become a seminal leader of the LGBT Rights movement.


MARVIN J. SONOSKY

(1909-1997)


"We used to joke about how long it took. But now a lot of people don't want the money. They want the land." Frank Lawrence, Standing Rock Tribal Chairman


Washington, D.C. lawyer, and the artist’s great uncle, who championed the cause of Native Americans litigating for 24 years the first land claim for the sacred North and South Dakota lands where the Dakota Access pipeline now runs.



Carole Freeman © 2016 All Images. All Rights Reserved

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All Portraits:

oil on linen

9 x 12 inches each

2018

Jerry Saltz

New York Magazine

April 15, 2018


These transporting portraits are beautiful meditations in paint on great women and men… Each is rendered lovingly and intensely; the works impart that the chariot to greatness comes in many forms and that every artist is also one of these mighty figures, laboring with passion in private shadows.