TORONTO INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL 

REBECCA GALLERY 

September 11 - 30, 2010

HYATT REGENCY HOTEL  (Headquarters for TIFF)

September - December  2010    2011   2012

Toronto, Canada


In September, 2010, Carole Freeman’s exhibition, If the Paparazzi Could Paint, referencing films and celebrities featured at the Toronto International Film Festival, was shown simultaneously at Rebecca Gallery and  throughout official Festival headquarters, the Hyatt Regency Hotel, across the street from TIFF Bell Lightbox, one of the Festival screening venues. Approximately fifty portraits included paintings of Julian Schnabel, Deepa Mehta, Steven Spielberg, David Cronenberg, Matt Damon, Robert De Niro, Robert Redford, Sarah Polley, Johnny Depp, Tim Burton, Uma Thurman and more, monotypes of Juliette Binoche, Dennis Hopper, Martin Scorcese, Helen Mirren, and more. The portrait of Isabella Rosellini was featured in a full page article, Celebrity Apprentice, in The National Post. After seeing the Depp portrait, Morgan Spurlock, director and actor in documentaries such as Supersize Me and Where in the World is Osama Bin Laden, commissioned Freeman to paint his producer, Jeremy Chilnick, in the exact same composition. (full story in COMMISSIONS)


In 2011,inspired by the stellar lineup of high-profile documentaries at the Festival that year, Freeman exhibited a new series, Doing the Docs, that focussed on premiers of Pina by Wim Wenders, Pearl Jam Twenty by Cameron Crowe, Gerhard Richter Painting by Corinna Belz, Paul Williams Still Alive by Stephen Kessler, Neil Young Journeys by Jonathon Demme,  From the Sky Down by Davis Guggenheim about the 1991 production of U2’s album Achtung Baby, and Concert for New York City by Abert Maysle, featuring performances by Paul McCartney, Mick Jagger, Keith Richards, David Bowie, Eric Clapton and more.


With paintings visible from the windows on King Street two years in a row, 2010 David Cronenberg and Steven Speilberg in 2010,   Bono and the Edge in 2011,  holding lambs referring to the honour of being made Freemen of Dublin allowing them to graze sheep in the city, Freeman’s work added to the Festival buzz with movie fans snapping photos from outside, and inside, tweeting selfies taken beside portraits of beloved actors, such as Johnnie Depp.


Remaining in the hotel long after the closing of each Festival, Piers Handling, director of TIFF, said Freeman’s work “ had become part of the Festival neighbourhood”.


In 2012, having other exhibition obligations, Freeman installed just a few paintings in a group exhibition: After No referred to Pablo Larrain’s film No and four paintings from a series titled Sets and Stills.

After No, acrylic on mylar on wood panel, 78 x 84 inches, 2012. (Hyatt Lobby)


Freeman’s montage, After No, is a juxtaposition of images based on film stills and set

documentation, news and media photos. 


Pablo Larrain’s film “No”, screening at TIFF 2012, dramatizes a national call to action through a non-violent ad campaign during the 1988 Chilean referendum on Augusto Pinochet's presidency. Approximately two weeks after “No” won this year’s Art Cinema Award at the Cannes Director’s Fortnight, a documentary casting Pinochet as a national hero premiered in Santiago, Chile, inspiring injuries, arrests, and real violence through the police use of tear gas and water cannons to disperse anti-Pinochet demonstrators.

Interpreting these events, Freeman contrasts the make-believe world of movies and real world images with her signature painterly style to envisage a layered commentary on the power of political leaders, the power of the ordinary citizen, and the power of films and their makers.

TORONTO INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL 2012

Hyatt Regency Hotel (Festival Headquarters)

Sets and Stills

Cosmopolis (David Cronenberg, Rob Pattison), Moonrise Kingdom (Jared Gilman, Kara Hayward), Hemingway and Gelhorn (Nicole Kidman, Clive Owen), Amour (Michael Haneke, Emmanuelle Riva, Jean-Louis Trintignant)

All acrylic on mylar, 8.5 x 11 inches , 2012.  (Hyatt Mix Bar)


Before film, there was photography. Before photography, there was paint.


For many modern and contemporary filmmakers, such as Tarkovsky, Pasolini, Fellini, Bunuel, and Kurosawa, film imagery was born in painting. For others, their films have been about painters, the act of painting, or the painting itself as seen in Julie Taymor’s Frida, Peter Watkins’s Edvard Munch, Derek Jarman’s Carravagio, Jacques Rivette’s La Belle Noiseuse, Lech Majewsky’s The Mill and The Cross, and Peter Greenaway’s The Marriage and Nightwatching.


These directors have taken an aspect of painting through a powerful metamorphosis to create a film or film image. Carole Freeman, in the series Sets and Stills, extracts film images and set documentation actualizing a reversal of history, to create a dialogue between film/photography and paint while affirming the validity of painting in the digital age.

TORONTO INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL 2011

DOING THE DOCS

Hyatt Regency Hotel (Festival Headquarters)

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Freemen of Dublin (Bono, Edge), oil, acrylic, graphite on mylar, 80 x 42 inches each


Referencing the film From the Sky Down by Davis Guggenheim, about the 1991 production of U2’s album Achtung Baby, Freeman painted atypical rock star portraits of Bono and Edge holding lambs, sourced from 1999 photos of the two as honorary freemen of Dublin when they were given the Freedom of the City award.


DUBLIN — Less than 24 hours after they were given the freedom of the city, members of the U2 rock band claimed one of their newly conferred privileges when they turned up onSunday afternoon with two lambs in St Stephen’s Green.

Bemused tourists and people out for a stroll in the sun watched as Bono, 39, whose real name is Paul Hewson, and the Edge, Dave Evans, 38, arrived in the Green with the borrowed lambs. Under old city charters, bestowing the freedom of the city also meant conferring the right to graze animals on commonage.

Though now a park surrounded by prestigious offices and the government departments of Foreign Affairs and Justice, the Green was common land when the roll call of honor was first established in 1876. Bono tried to explain: "Dublin city is about tolerance. We want to set some sheep free."

The Edge called his pet "My Little Lamb." Bono named his "Michael Jackson". "He’s baaaaad," he explained.

Bono, who confessed he was little bit nervous before the ceremony, described the conferring as a "big deal." "It’s the biggest honor this city can give you," he said. Afterwards, the band performed an impromptu short concert.

The Irish Echo, Andrew Bushe, October 6, 1999

Tanztheater Wuppertaal (left), Pina Bausch (right), oil, acrylic, graphite on mylar, 80 x 42 inches each. (Hyatt Lobby)


Referencing Wim Wender’s 3D tribute to the late German choreographer, Pina Bausch, as her dancers perform her most famous creations.

Concert for New York City: Paul McCartney (front),  Gerhard Richter Painting (back), oil, acrylic, graphite on mylar, 36 x 42 inches each. (Hyatt Restaurant King Street Social Kitchen)

Paul Williams Still Alive, oil, acrylic, graphite on mylar, 36 x 42 inches  (Hyatt Restaurant King Street Social Kitchen)

Pearl Jam Twenty, oil, acrylic, graphite on mylar, 42 x 84 inches each. (Hyatt Restaurant King Street Social Kitchen)

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TORONTO INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL 2010

IF THE PAPARAZZI COULD PAINT

Hyatt Regency Hotel (Official Festival Headquarters)

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Installing David Cronenberg oil, acrylic, graphite on mylar, 84 x 84 inches.

(Hyatt Lobby)

Steven Spielberg, oil, acrylic, graphite on mylar, 42 x 60 inches. (Hyatt Lobby)

Julian Schnabel, oil, acrylic, graphite on mylar, 42 x 60 inches. (Hyatt Mix Bar)

Matt Damon, oil, acrylic, graphite on mylar, 42 x 60 inches. (Hyatt Mix Bar)

Deepa Mehta, oil, acrylic, graphite on mylar, 42 x 70 inches.

(Hyatt Restaurant King Street Social Kitchen)

David Cronenberg oil, acrylic, graphite on mylar, 84 x 84 inches.

(Installed 2011 in Hyatt Restaurant King Street Social Kitchen)

Johnny Depp (left), Tim Burton (right), oil, acrylic, graphite on mylar, 42 x 80 inches each. (Hyatt Lobby)

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TORONTO INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL 2010

IF THE PAPARAZZI COULD PAINT

REBECCA GALLERY

September 11 - 30, 2010

David Cronenberg oil, acrylic, graphite on mylar, 84 x 84 inches

Christopher Plummer (front), Isabella Rossellini (middle),  Robert De Niro (back). (Hyatt Restaurant King Street Social Kitchen)

Uma Thurman (front),  Robert Redford (back).

(Hyatt Restaurant King Street Social Kitchen)

Sarah Silvernan (front), Isabella Rossellini (middle),  Robert De Niro (back).

(Hyatt Restaurant King Street Social Kitchen)

Helen Mirren (left),  Robert De Niro (right)

Paul Giamatti

Red Carpet, acrylic on mylar on wood panel, 8 x 10 inches each. (Meeting Room Hyatt

Woody Allen, Judi Dench, Paul Giamotti, monotypes, 7.5 x 10 inches

Various actors, oil on mylar on wod panel, 8 x 10 inches each

Various actors, oil on mylar on wood panel, 8 x 10 inches each

Sarah Polley, Mickey Rourke,Julian Schnabel

Julian Schnabel, Steven Spielberg, Deepa Mehta, oil on mylar , 42 x 70 inches each

(left to right) Martin Scorcese, Dennis Hopper, Johnny Depp, Javier Bardem, Helen Mirren, Ellen Page, monotypes, 7.5 x 10 inches each